How Long Will Alcohol Stay In the System For Urine Tests?

A number of individuals who drink alcoholic beverages work for employers that have initiated random urine
alcohol tests. It thus becomes understandable when many employees ask the following question, “how long does
alcohol last in urine drug screenings”?

Why Urine Alcohol Tests Are Used in the Workplace

Many individuals who drink alcoholic beverages work at organization, agencies, institutions, and companies that
have established a random alcohol testing program. Many of these companies and workplaces use urine alcohol
tests.

Why urine alcohol tests? Because urine alcohol tests are relatively inexpensive and they are the most likely of
all drug-testing methods to withstand legal challenge.

Not only this, but urine alcohol tests have a high assurance of reliable results and they provide the most
flexibility in testing different drugs, including alcohol and nicotine.

Obviously, individuals who are employed at work places that use urine alcohol tests many times ask the following
question: how long will alcohol stay in the system for urine tests?

To help answer this question, consider the following information.

Blood Alcohol Concentration Level

The amount of alcohol in the blood is called blood alcohol content or blood alcohol concentration (BAC). Alcohol
is metabolized at the rate of .015 of (BAC) every hour.

For instance, a person with a BAC of .15 (this BAC is almost twice the legal amount when driving) will have no
measurable alcohol in the bloodstream ten hours after the last drink (.15 divided by .015 = 10).

If a person is driving and gets pulled over by the police, the police can administer a blood alcohol test
(usually done by a breathalyzer test).

If the person has a BAC of .08 or higher, he or she is considered to be driving “under the influence” (DUI). A
person with a BAC of .08 will have no measurable alcohol in the bloodstream 5.33 hours after the last drink (.08
divided by .015 = 5.33).



The EtG Urine Alcohol Test

With some urine alcohol tests, alcohol can be detected up to around 48 hours after a person has ingested
alcohol. With the EtG Urine Alcohol Test, however the presence of EtG in the urine demonstrates that ethanol
alcohol was ingested within the past 3 or 4 days, or roughly 80 hours after the ethanol alcohol has been
metabolized by the body.

As a result, it can be determined that a urine alcohol test employing EtG is a more accurate indicator of the
recent consumption of alcohol as opposed to simply measuring for the existence of ethanol alcohol (as is done many
other urine alcohol tests).

Let’s use one of the above examples to further illustrate the ramifications of the EtG Urine Alcohol Test. As
stated above, a person with a blood alcohol concentration of .15 will have no measurable alcohol in his or her
bloodstream ten hours after the last drink.

With the EtG Urine Alcohol Test, however, the presence of EtG in the urine reveals that ethanol alcohol was
consumed within the past 80 hours or so which could mean many hours after the ethanol alcohol has been metabolized
by the body.

Think this through for a moment. No, the EtG Urine Alcohol Test cannot tell how much alcohol a person ingested,
but it can, however, detect alcohol consumption after the alcohol has been metabolized by the person’s body.

The significance of this is that if the person, for instance, has stated that he or she has stopped drinking for
any period of time, this test will show that they are not telling the truth.

Conclusion: How Long Will Alcohol Stay In the System For Urine
Tests

As outlined above, EtG urine alcohol tests can detect alcohol in the urine up to 80 hours after the alcohol has
been metabolized by an individual’s liver.

Taking this into consideration, the moral of the story is this: if you drink alcohol, if you work for an
employer that has implemented random urine alcohol testing, and if you want to keep your job, it seems reasonable
to suggest that you abstain from drinking alcohol during the work week. Then you won’t have to ask the following:
“how long does alcohol last in urine drug screenings”?

How Long can Alcohol be Detected by a Saliva Test?

As a consequence of escalating monetary losses due to alcohol-related accidents and “sick days,” an
increasing number of employers throughout the United States have implemented random alcohol and drug tests as part
of their employee drug and alcohol screening programs.

Since companies and organizations want the most “bang for their buck,” many of them are considering using
saliva alcohol tests and, as a result, are asking the following question: “How Long can Alcohol be Detected by a
Saliva Test”?

Some Basic Characteristics of Saliva Drug Tests

Traces of drugs, drug metabolites, and alcohol can be detected in saliva. Saliva is easy to collect: a swab of
the inner cheek is the most common way.

Saliva tests are more difficult to adulterate or substitute, and collection is less invasive than with hair or
urine testing.

Since drugs and drug metabolites do not remain in saliva as long as they do in urine, however, the saliva method
shows more possibilities in detecting current use and impairment.

Saliva alcohol tests detect the presence of alcohol in the saliva, and are a relatively good approximation of
blood alcohol content (BAC).

Due to the fact that the concentration of alcohol in saliva is very likely to be similar to the BAC that is in
the blood, saliva is a preferred alcohol testing method.

Saliva Tests have the following characteristics:

  • They are slightly more expensive than urine testing, but less than hair or blood testing.
  • They are a relatively non-intrusive method of drug testing.
  • They are becoming more common compared to the other methods of testing.
  • They are easy to administer but require lab processing for accuracy.
  • They detect use primarily within the past day or so.
  • They can detect more recent drug use than other testing methods.
  • They have no nationally accepted cutoff concentrations or standards for detection. This makes the results
    more dependent on the specific product employed and could make results less-reliable and/or acceptable for
    legal considerations.



  • They are more reliable for the detection of methamphetamine and opiates and less reliable for THC or
    cannabinoids.

Saliva Drug Tests Pros

  • They provide samples that are acquired under direct observation.
  • They present a minimal risk of tampering.
  • They spare patients the discomfort of repeated vein punctures.
  • They are non-invasive.
  • They present no risk of infection, thrombosis, or anemia.
  • They present lower total testing costs since no special staff training is required for collection.
  • They provide for samples that can be collected easily in almost any environment.
  • They can detect alcohol use.
  • They reflect recent drug use.
  • They provide a relatively short window of detection, approximately 10 to 24 hours.

Saliva Drug Tests Cons

  • They present some detection limitation since drugs and drug metabolites do not remain in the saliva as long
    as they do in the urine.

  • They are less efficient than other testing methods in detecting marijuana use.

Conclusion: How Long can Alcohol be Detected by a Saliva Test?

As articulated above, an increasing number of employers throughout the United States have established random
alcohol and drug tests as part of their employee alcohol and drug screening procedures.

Furthermore, many of these companies and organizations are considering the pros and cons of saliva alcohol tests
and, as a result, are asking the following question: “how long can alcohol be detected by a saliva test”? In
summary, the answer to this question is as follows: “approximately 10 to 24 hours.

Hair Tests for Alcohol

Do hair tests for alcohol exist? If so, are they reliable and can they detect alcohol consumption?

An Examination of a Person’s Hair Can Detect Drug and Alcohol Use for Many
Months

An analysis of a person’s hair can result in a significantly longer testing window for the detection of drugs
and drug metabolites.

This provides a more complete alcohol and drug-use history that can go back in time as far as many months.

Similar to urine testing, hair testing does not reveal evidence of current impairment, only past use of a
specific drug.

And of special note, hair testing until recently could not be used to detect alcohol.

Hair Drug Tests have the following characteristics:

  • They are currently many times more costly than urine tests.
  • They are a relatively non-intrusive method of drug and alcohol testing.
  • They detect substance use over a longer period of time.
  • They do not usually detect drug or alcohol use within the past seven days.
  • They require a sample of hair approximately the diameter of a pencil and about 1.5 inches long.
  • They cannot be done with a single hair.
  • They reveal positive test results more than twice as often as urine tests.
  • They are not significantly affected by brief periods of abstinence from drugs or alcohol.
  • They can sometimes be used to determine when drug use started and if it has been discontinued.

Can hair testing be defeated or beaten? No adulterants have been found that can beat hair tests for drugs. Plus,
the risk is minimized due to the fact that every collection is directly and easily observed.



Some Benefits and Advantages of Hair Tests for Drug Screening

Hair Tests Pros

The following represents some of the positive features of hair tests:

  • They have a longer window of detection.
  • They offer greater stability (i.e, they do not deteriorate).
  • They can detect chronic drug and/or alcohol use.
  • They provide convenient shipping and storage, since they do not require refrigeration.
  • They off a collection procedure that is not invasive or embarrassing.
  • They are more difficult to adulterate than urine.
  • They detect the combined use of alcohol AND cocaine.
  • They can provide a many month drug and alcohol usage history.

Hair Tests Cons

The following represents some of the negative features of hair tests:

  • They are relatively expensive.
  • They are usually limited to basic 5-drug panel.
  • They can not detect very recent drug use (i.e., usage from 1 to 7 days before the test).

Conclusion: Hair Tests for Alcohol

While hair tests have been a reliable and accurate instrument for drug testing for many years, hair tests for
alcohol have recently become appropriate for alcohol screening and testing because they now can detect alcohol.

Employee Drug and Alcohol Testing Statistics

In many instances, what “hits home” in a presentation or in a discussion is a list of relevant and
hard-hitting statistics and facts that for whatever reason, seem to make more of an impact on people’s
consciousness.

This is why the following workplace drug and alcohol testing statistics are presented. Please continue
reading for more information about employee drug and alcohol testing statistics and facts.

The Different Kinds of Employee Alcohol Tests

There are primarily five different kinds of alcohol tests that are currently available for testing employees in
the workplace: saliva alcohol tests, blood alcohol tests (also called blood tests for alcohol or alcohol blood
tests), urine alcohol tests, hair alcohol tests, and alcohol breathalyzer tests (also called alcohol breath tests
or breath alcohol tests).

It can be stressed that hair tests for alcohol are a relatively recent development. More overtly, until 2008,
hair tests could not detect alcohol and were therefore used mainly for drug testing rather than for alcohol
testing.

The Need For Drug and Alcohol Testing Statistics

Unfortunately, certain issues, such as the need for drug and alcohol testing in the workplace, do not make a
significant impact on people’s awareness until relevant facts and statistics are presented. With this in mind, the
following drug and alcohol testing statistics and facts will be listed.

  • Substance abusers are 33% to 50% less productive than individuals who are not substance abusers.
  • The research literature confirms that abusive drinking is associated with negative work behaviors such as
    and frequent job changes and absenteeism.

  • An estimated 58.8 million (51.4 percent) workers indicated that random testing would not influence their
    decision to work for an employer.



  • The alcohol abuse research literature shows that workplace alcohol testing programs are associated with
    less alcohol dependence and alcohol use by employees.

  • Substance abusers are absent an average of three or more weeks per year and are late for work three times
    more frequently than non-substance abusers.

  • Approximately 40% of the industrial fatalities and 47% of the injuries that take place in the U.S.
    workplace are associated with alcoholism and alcohol abuse.

  • An estimated 45.5 million (39.8 percent) workers reported that they would be more likely to work for an
    employer who tests randomly for drug or alcohol use, while 10.0 million (8.7 percent) workers reported that
    they would be less likely.

  • Substance abusers are three to four times more likely to have an accident on the job and five times more
    likely to file a workers’ compensation claim.

  • More than 40% of U.S. corporate CEOs who participated in a recent survey stated that the use of illegal
    drugs and alcohol costs them from 1% to 10% of their annual payroll.

  • An estimated 50% to 80% of loss regarding pilferage and theft is related to substance-using employees.
  • Substance abusers, when compared with people who are not substance abusers, file 300% to 400% more costly
    medical claims.

Conclusion: Employee Drug and Alcohol Testing Statistics

Various facts and statistics about alcohol testing in the workplace have been presented. It is hoped that these
statistics and facts have added some insights into the importance of employee drug and alcohol testing in today’s
organizations, institutions, and companies.

Based on the above statistics, however, it is clear that employee drug and alcohol testing will more likely than
not continue in the near future due to the number of drug and alcohol-related accidents, injuries, and deaths that
continue to take place in the U.S. workplace.

Employee Alcohol Testing

Find out why employee alcohol testing is on the increase in the United States and what actual considerations
are influencing employee alcohol testing in U.S. corporations, institutions, and companies.

And keep in mind that from a practical outlook, most of what applies to employee “alcohol testing” also
applies to employee “drug and alcohol testing.”

Types of Employee Alcohol Tests

There are essentially five different types of alcohol tests that are available for workplace alcohol testing
protocols: alcohol breathalyzer tests (also called breath alcohol tests and alcohol breath tests), hair alcohol
tests, alcohol blood tests (also called blood tests for alcohol or blood alcohol tests), saliva alcohol tests, and
urine alcohol tests.

It can be noted that hair alcohol testing is relatively recent. More precisely, until 2008, hair tests could not
detect alcohol and were consequently used almost exclusively for testing for drugs other than alcohol.

Why Is Employee Alcohol Testing Increasing?

In more than a few states in the U.S., employee drug and alcohol testing is increasing due to the “drug-free
workplace” movement; rising workers compensation premiums; frequently occurring, alcohol-related, on-the-job
accidents, injuries, and deaths; and to poor production that is alcohol-related.

Employee Alcohol Testing and Employee’s Privacy Rights

In many respects, employee alcohol testing is a balancing act between protecting employees’ privacy rights on
the one hand and addressing and trying to lessen alcohol-related productivity, fatalities, injuries, accidents, and
violence issues on the other.

Interestingly, despite the fact that some states in actual fact do not recognize employee drug and alcohol
testing, others, however, do permit company drug and alcohol testing if detailed procedural precautions are put
into action.

Such safety measures, it might be noted, are instigated so that the testing is administered in a way that
respects employees’ rights of privacy.

For instance, the employment of closed-circuit cameras is not permitted to monitor relatively intrusive urine
and blood alcohol testing protocols.

Required Alcohol Testing For Work-Related Accidents

In some states, employers have created mandatory alcohol and drug testing when an on-the-job accident has taken
place.

If the testing procedure verifies that the employee was undeniably under the influence of alcohol at the time of
the accident and that the employee’s blood alcohol concentration was .08 grams or greater, in some states like
Ohio, neither the employer nor workers compensation is duty-bound to pay for lost wages or for medical costs that
resulted from the accident.

Stated more forcefully, if you live in Ohio and you incur injuries in an on-the-job accident that was
established to be alcohol-related (at or above the .08 level) and you miss at least four weeks of work because of
these injuries, in all probability you will not get any wage compensation for the time you missed either by your
employer or by workers compensation.



Not only this, but if you have obtained medical rehabilitation for these injuries, again, neither workers
compensation nor your employer is duty-bound to pay for this therapy.

The Justification For Employee Drug and Alcohol Testing

Having said this, it is essential to ask the following question: why are many employers initiating drug-free
work environments and implementing alcohol testing in their places of employment?

Before listing these “reasons” it is imperative to call attention to the fact that the underlying reasons for
employee “alcohol testing” also applies to the larger discussion of employee “drug and alcohol testing.”

For example, the statement “alcohol tests create a safer work environment” from a wider standpoint can be
restated to read as follows: “drug and alcohol tests create a safer work environment.”

The following list illustrates some of the underlying reasons for employee alcohol testing:

  • Alcohol tests reduce employee turnover
  • Alcohol tests considerably upgrade the workforce by weeding out employees who refuse to get alcohol therapy
    and by removing prospective employees via required pre-hire drug and alcohol tests

  • Alcohol tests create a safer work environment
  • Alcohol tests increase worker productivity
  • Alcohol tests decrease employee sexual harassment
  • Alcohol tests reduce employee theft
  • Alcohol tests decrease spending due to the fact that worker’s compensation offers premiums if employers
    originate random drug and alcohol testing

  • Alcohol tests decrease employee violence
  • Alcohol tests diminish on-the-job alcohol-related accidents, injuries, and deaths

Conclusion: Employee Alcohol Testing

In various states, organizational alcohol testing is escalating due to costly, debilitating, and at times,
deadly alcohol-related, on-the-job accidents and injuries; alcohol-related work inefficiency; and mounting workers
compensation premiums. Not an insignificant number of drug and alcohol testing facts and statistics reinforce the
reasons for more alcohol testing in organizations by U.S. employers.

Furthermore, required testing for work-related accidents has resulted in situations in which employees did not
receive work compensation or compensation for medical therapy by their employers or by workers compensation when
they were tested and found to be under the influence of alcohol (at the .08 or higher lever) at the time of a
work-related accident.

It is imperative to note that whereas the focal point of the above discussion was on employee alcohol testing
and alcohol testing in the workplace, from a conceptual orientation, most of what applies to employee “alcohol
testing” also applies to employee “drug and alcohol testing.”

For example, the statement “alcohol tests increase worker productivity” can be expanded to read as follows:
“drug and alcohol tests increase worker productivity.”

It also needs to be pointed out that whereas law enforcement officers seem to prefer administering a breath
alcohol test such as a breathalyzer in the field, most employers use urine alcohol tests to test their employees in
the workplace.

Based on the many alcohol-related problems that can and do arise in companies, institutions, and corporations,
employee drug and alcohol testing is likely to continue and plausibly increase in the foreseeable future.

DUI Information

Have you been charged with DUI? Keep in mind that a local DUI lawyer may be able to help you fight the
charges against you and save your driver’s license.

Disclaimer

This website, Alcohol Test Info, is owned and managed by Integrity Business Systems and
Solutions
.

The content of this website serves two purposes: first and foremost, providing relevant information and second,
making an income based on our affiliate relationships.

Neither Integrity Business Systems and Solutions nor Alcohol Test Info renders medical or
legal advice or professional services.



Moreover, none of the content on Alcohol Test Info establishes an attorney-client relationship.

The outcome of a legal action necessarily depends on the facts and circumstances particular to that action and,
as a consequence, results will be different from case to case.

What is more, every once-in-a-while, the DUI laws change and the information on Alcohol Test Info may
not reflect the most current changes.

No individual should rely upon or act upon any legal information contained on this website without first seeking
the advice of a lawyer.

Additionally, no individual should rely upon or act upon any medical or psychological information contained on
this website without first seeking the advice of a doctor or a healthcare professional.

Alcoholism Videos

Here are some wonderful alcoholism videos for you to watch and enjoy.

We have included some alcoholism videos (located below) so that you can see and hear directly from various
people about their struggles with this disease.

If you, a family member, or one of your friends has a “drinking problem,” seeing what others have gone through
and how they attained successful recovery is much more “real” than any information you can read about.

Furthermore, watching these videos may help you understand what others with a drinking problem are experiencing.
So make sure you look at these excellent videos!

The first video is entitled “Talking With Cat Power” and is about the professional singer/songwriter Cat Power, her alcoholism, and her recovery. This video is 4 minutes
and 39 seconds long.

The second video is entitled “What It Really Feels Like” and is about a young lady about 20 years old who
discusses the fact that her Dad is dying from alcoholism. In this video, this young lady stresses how important it
is for people to stay away from excessive drinking. This video is 9 minutes and 39 seconds long.

The third video is entitled “Truth and Consequences” and is about teen drinking, sex, fetal alcohol syndrome,
smoking, drugs, and the effects of alcohol, drugs, and smoking on the unborn child. This video is 10 minutes and 1
second long.



The fourth video is entitled “Ferguson Speaks From The Heart” and is about late night talk show host Craig
Ferguson and his ordeal with alcoholism. Ferguson, who has been sober for 15 years, talks honestly about drinking
and how some people, including himself, cannot drink alcohol–even responsibly.

Ferguson stresses that everyone has to be responsible for their own actions. Ferguson then talked about Britney
Spears and identified her as a person who needs compassion and help. This is a well-done, honest video about
alcoholism that is worth watching. This video is 12 minutes and 30 minutes long.

The fifth video is entitled “Recovery: What Makes An Addict” is a video about addiction. A key topic is that
when we focus on the “why” of addiction, we find out that addicts are trying to change the way they feel. Also
discussed are the 12 characteristics of addiction. This video is 9 minutes and 19 seconds long.

DUI Frequently Asked Questions

Since “driving under the influence” (DUI) is the most frequently committed crime in the United States, it
stands to reason that many people have a lot of questions about this topic.

As a result of the prevalence of DUI incidents as well as the harsh consequences that are associated with
driving under the influence circumstances, we are providing some of the most frequently asked questions about
driving under the influence.

What is “DUI”?

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Drunk driving or “driving under the influence” (DUI) is sometimes called driving while intoxicated (DWI) and
has two meanings:

First, DUI means driving with a blood alcohol level over the state’s maximum permissible blood alcohol
limit. As of May, 2007, the limit for adults is 0.08% in all 50 states in the United States.

Second, an adult may also be guilty of DUI or DWI for driving when his or her physical and/or mental
abilities are adversely affected by alcohol, drugs, or a combination of alcohol and drugs.

In fact, according to the law, it makes absolutely no difference whether the drug is legal or illegal,
prescription or over-the-counter.

If drinking alcohol and/or taking drugs negatively impacts an individual’s reaction time, ability to judge
distances, hearing, or his or her sight, or any other physical or mental ability used in driving, the person
may be found guilty of a “driving under the influence” driving offense.

Why do I need a DUI attorney?

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It is the “job” of a DUI attorney to show the judge all the impressive things you have done in your adult
life such as the fact that you are a community volunteer, that you are a good father or mother, your
commendable work record, that you are an active member of your church, and the fact that you regularly pay
taxes (that is, if this information is “factual”). Indeed, armed with this information, the judge is more
likely to view your case favorably.

DUI has become a very sophisticated and complicated area of jurisprudence. In point of fact, many criminal
defense attorneys will admit that given the many talents and skills that need to be mastered by a DUI defense
attorney, this area of specialization can be one of the most difficult areas of criminal law in which the
lawyer can engage.

Every state now has stringent DUI penalties in place to help prevent people from drinking and driving.
Examples of such penalties include the following:

  • A suspended driver’s license.
  • The installation of an ignition interlock device.
  • Vehicle impoundment.
  • Mandatory alcohol education classes (at your expense).
  • Probation.
  • Community service.
  • Substantial fines and court fees (sometimes in excess of $5,000 or more).
  • Jail time.

Even for a first DUI conviction, you could lose your driver’s license, face possible restrictions on your
interstate and international travel, experience insurance coverage problems, and lose your job. The good news,
on the other hand, is that it is likely that you can avoid most or perhaps all of these penalties by hiring a
DUI attorney.

A DUI attorney will be able to evaluate your case and determine if there are constitutional violations or
other defenses that potentially weaken the prosecution’s case. Armed with this information, the DUI attorney
can negotiate with the prosecution for a reduced charge and in some circumstances, even a complete dismissal of
your charges. In sum, without the representation of a “drunk driving” attorney, you considerably reduce your
chances of getting the best possible legal results.

What is the best way to beat a drunk-driving charge?

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The best way to avoid a DUI arrest is to refrain from drinking when you drive. Call a family member or a
friend for a ride, call a taxi, or use a designated driver or don’t drink alcohol if you are going to need to
drive in the next few hours.

Can the judge impose more than the mandatory minimum jail time for a person who received a
DUI?

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When a person receives a DUI conviction, the judge can impose up to the maximum jail time allowable for a
DUI offense. Conversely, with respect to a DUI case, the judge cannot impose less than the mandatory minimum
jail time.



Regarding a DUI arrest, how much time do I have to contact an attorney?

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If you were not able to contact an attorney while you were jail, you should get in touch a DUI lawyer as
soon as possible after you get out of jail. Since there are some legal procedures that take place very soon
after your release from jail, time can truly be of the essence.

If my blood alcohol concentration is less than .08%, can I still lose my driver’s license?

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It’s certainly possible for a person to lose his or her driver’s license with a blood alcohol concentration
under .08%. A person, however, usually loses his or her license as a consequence of a previous DUI conviction
or for a related offense. Generally speaking, in order for an individual’s driver’s license to be automatically
suspended, his or her blood alcohol content must be .08 or greater while driving.

I’m simply going To plead guilty to my DUI. Why do I need a DUI attorney?

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Concerning a DUI arrest, maybe the biggest mistake a person can make is to automatically plead guilty in
court. Without a DUI lawyer to represent an individual, he or she is basically giving up all of his or her
rights for legal representation in court and is, in essence, accepting whatever happens.

This can become a big mistake that can negatively affect an individual’s future employment opportunities and
his or her ability to get insurance for his or her vehicle, to travel as freely as he or she desires, to own a
vehicle, to get a professional license in his or her chosen line of work, to get “good” credit ratings, and
many other important issues in life of which he or she may not be immediately aware.

In most states, a DUI conviction will remain on a person’s driving record for a minimum of five years.
During this time, the person may be quite “handicapped” when experiencing any or all of the “scenarios” given
above. In a word, a DUI defense attorney is quite important in providing the legal representation an individual
needs in a DUI case.

What happens to my driver’s license if I am an out of state driver and I receive a DUI?

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Regarding receiving a DUI conviction and getting your driver’s license suspended, keep in mind that at least
45 states and the District of Columbia participate in the “Driver’s License Compact Act.” What this means is
that a “driving under the influence” conviction in another state will be reported to your home state that, in
turn, will usually take action to suspend your driver’s license based on the conviction that was ruled by the
out-of-state court. As a consequence, even if you have an out-of-state driver’s license, it seems logical from
a legal standpoint for you to contact a local DUI attorney in your state to represent you if you are arrested
for DUI.

I consumed only 4 or 5 beers and was not “drunk.” Can I still be convicted of DUI?

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A person can be convicted of DUI if his or her driving was adversely affected in any noticeable manner by
the consumption of alcohol. Drinking 4 to 5 beers within a one or two hour time frame can, quite frankly,
result in a blood alcohol concentration from .06% to .09%, “depending” on the individual’s body weight, how
much alcohol was in the beer (some beer contains more alcohol content than others), how quickly the person
drank the beer, the person’s metabolism rate, and if the individual was drinking on a “full” or on an “empty”
stomach. In conclusion, drinking 4 or 5 beers may be sufficient to violate either the “under the influence”
standard or the “per se standard” (.08% in all 50 U.S. states).

Can I appeal my DUI to a circuit court?

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Every person in the U.S. who receives a DUI conviction in a district or a municipal court has the legal
right to appeal this lower court’s conviction to the county circuit court. Be alerted to the fact, however,
that in many states there is a closely adhered to 14-day time frame in which the appeal must be filed. If the
appeal is not correctly filed within the 14-day time frame, the appeal will be considered “waived,” a
circumstance that isn’t open to re-filing at a later date.

DUI Attorney Info

What is DUI?

Driving under the influence (DUI) is defined as the criminal act of operating a motor vehicle while impaired by
alcohol, drugs, or both. DUI is also the criminal act of operating a motor vehicle with a blood alcohol
concentration (BAC) of 0.08% or higher.

It is important to emphasize the fact that an individual can be charged with “driving under the influence” if he
or she operates a motor vehicle while under the influence of any amount of drugs or alcohol, or a
combination of the two, which makes the person unable to safely operate the vehicle that he or she is driving.

The key point to highlight here is that an adult can receive a DUI with a blood alcohol concentration (BAC) that
is less than .08%.

Why Do I Need a DUI Attorney?

Being arrested for DUI can elicit feelings of depression, anger, embarrassment, and fear. People from all walks
of life have been arrested for DUI.

Keep in mind that the more control you take over in your life now, including educating yourself about current
DUI laws, the greater peace of mind you will probably experience. Due to the fact that you are in a vulnerable
situation, you need to consult with an attorney you can trust.

If you have been charged with DUI you need an attorney who will aggressively represent your legal rights through
the complexities involved in a DUI case. DUI lawyers are able to assist you every step of the way through the
criminal process and help you find the answers you need.

Having a DUI defense attorney can make the entire DUI experience far less stressful. In addition, a DUI attorney
can answer your questions, prepare you for the proceedings each and every step of the way, and ensure that if there
is a way to help you within the law, he or she will find this way.



DUI lawyers work within this specialized area of the law. They have access to legal techniques, research data,
and information of which other lawyers may not be aware.

DUI attorneys understand the system and offer you a better chance to retain your freedom than you would have by
representing yourself OR by hiring an attorney who is not trained about DUI law.

Have you been charged with DUI? A local DUI lawyer may be able to help you fight the charges against you and
save your driver’s license.

Disclaimer

This website, Alcohol Test Info, is owned and managed by Integrity Business Systems and
Solutions
.

The content of this website serves two purposes: first and foremost, providing relevant information and second,
making an income based on our affiliate relationships.

Neither Integrity Business Systems and Solutions nor Alcohol Test Info renders medical or
legal advice or professional services. Moreover, none of the content on Alcohol Test Info establishes an
attorney-client relationship.

The outcome of a legal action necessarily depends on the facts and circumstances particular to that action and,
as a consequence, results will be different from case to case.

What is more, every once-in-a-while, the DUI laws change and the information on Alcohol Test Info may
not reflect the most current changes.

No individual should rely upon or act upon any legal information contained on this website without first seeking
the advice of a lawyer.

Additionally, no individual should rely upon or act upon any medical or psychological information contained on
this website without first seeking the advice of a doctor or a healthcare professional.

Drunk Driving

One of the most widely publicized alcohol abuse effects concerns drunk driving, also known as driving “under
the influence” of alcohol.

Required alcoholism rehabilitation for individuals incarcerated for alcohol-related offenses and substantial
changes in our beliefs toward drinking alcoholic beverages, when added to the current anti-drunk driving
initiatives and laws, are likely to make a substantial affect on reducing the deplorable number of individuals in
our society who die in alcohol-related traffic accidents.

Please continue reading to find out more information about drunk driving in the United States.

Some Sobering Thoughts

An article entitled “Drunk Driving” was featured on the “Insurance Data Start” website in February of 2007.
Pardon the pun, but the following three statistical bits of information that were articulated in this article are
quite sobering, if not perplexing.

Alcohol-Related Fatalities

First, in spite of increasing the large quantity of anti-drunk driving laws and campaigns, the number of
individuals who died in alcohol-related accidents decreased by only .2% from 2004 to 2005 (16,919 in 2004 versus
16,885 in 2005).

While every life saved is vital, this decrease, from a statistical standpoint, all the same, was not
meaningful.

In other words, the fact that 34 fewer people died in alcohol-related accidents in 2005 than in 2004 could have
happened totally by chance rather than because of harsher drunk driving laws or because of the influence of citizen
activist groups such as Mothers Against Drunk Drivers (MADD).

Repeat DUI Wrongdoers

Second, even with the passing of more stern DUI laws and outcomes, over 50% of US drivers arrested for drunk
driving are repeat lawbreakers.

This statistic is disturbing when examined on its own merits. What has also become important, though, is the
number of repeat wrongdoers who have acquired an shocking large quantity of DWIs.

For example in early 2006, an Ohio man who acquired 12 DWIs within a ten-year period of time killed two Hiram
college students in an alcohol-related accident. Not surprisingly, several people in the local communities were
irritated with the driver who accidentally killed the two students of higher education.

What was perhaps more enlightening in this condition, then again, was the multiplicity of phone calls made to
the radio talk shows by people asking who the judges and prosecutors were and what the consequences were for this
driver after he received his 3rd, his 8th, and his 11th DWIs.

Stated differently, people starting asking the demanding questions concerning the trustworthiness of those who
acquired many DUIs and also the accountability of the judges and prosecutors who were involved in the repeat
offenders’ legal proceedings.

Drivers with Suspended Licenses Still Drive

Third, 67% of U.S. drivers with suspended licenses still drive. From a rational perspective, various people must
be asking themselves how this is feasible in an age of technological improvement that has capabilities such as
“real-time” computer access to driver registration specifics specifically available to the law enforcement
enterprise.

Drunk Driving Programs

According to the authors of “Drunk Driving,” a number of countermeasures have been created that have targeted
alcohol-related deaths on the U. S. roads.



For instance, existing drunk driving laws have become more stringent, new laws have been passed, drunk driving
task forces have been created by numerous states, and citizen activist groups like MADD have affected some of the
thoughts toward drinking and driving in our society.

As meaningful as these anti-drunk driving laws and programs have been, nevertheless, the fact remains that only
34 fewer people died in alcohol-related accidents in 2005 than in 2004.

Perceptibly, other countermeasures must be commenced in order to extensively trim down the multiplicity of U.S.
individuals who die in alcohol-related traffic accidents.

Supplementary Anti-Drunk Driving Schemes

In response to the requirement for more ammo in the battle on alcohol-related traffic accidents, I put forward
two supplementary anti-drunk driving schemes.

First, those who are jailed due to alcohol-related offenses need to get essential alcoholism counseling even if
they are in jail or in prison.

Without any question, other drivers are safer when the offending persons are off the streets and locked up. When
the jail or prison sentence is completed, all the same, the vast majority of alcohol-related wrongdoers will go
back to the real world.

Recognizing this reality, I suggest that alcohol-related lawbreakers who have obtained alcoholism therapy
although jailed are more likely to become accountable people who abstain from drinking alcohol while driving and
less likely to become repeat DWI offenders once they return to society.

Second, compelling and identifiable revisions in our beliefs regarding drinking alcohol need to transpire in our
society. Since drinking alcohol is so available, unobjectionable, and exhaustively ingrained in our society, on the
other hand, it has been very complicated for many people, particularly the young people, to truly comprehend the
harmful, damaging, and deadly facets of alcohol abuse and alcoholism. This needs to change.

Our Knowledgeable and Informed Society

Our society has become more insightful and more aware of the physical and mental conditions, hazards,
fatalities, and detrimental end products of alcohol abuse and alcohol addiction.

It is therefore time for us to balance the current marketing “message” with a more undeniable and healthy
viewpoint regarding alcohol consumption.

Stated in a different way, drinking alcohol needs to be less advertised, less glamorized, and seen as less
“cool” while the commercials, ads, and public service messages that underline healthy, safe and sound, and
alcohol-free conduct and lifestyles need to be enhanced.

Conclusion: Alcohol Abuse Effects – Drunk Driving

Clearly, something besides our current anti-drunk driving laws and schemes needs to be done in order to
drastically reduce the alcohol-related deaths on our highways.

It is affirmed that requisite alcohol addiction therapy for individuals who are incarcerated for alcohol-related
offenses and obvious and meaningful modifications in our mind-sets toward drinking alcoholic beverages are crucial
factors that will contribute to the demonstrative decrease in the multiplicity of people in our society who die in
alcohol-related traffic accidents every year.

From a different perspective, if you involve yourself in drunk driving at the very least you are abusing
alcohol. As a result, it is important to keep the following fact in mind: the more alcohol is consumed in an
abusive manner, the more likely it is that the drinker will become an alcoholic. If this describes you, then you
need to be honest with yourself and admit that you have a drinking problem.

Once you have taken this step, consider making it a priority to talk with an alcohol abuse and alcoholism
professional about getting alcohol treatment as soon as possible.